How is the character tituba inportant

Summary Analysis Betty Parris has fallen into a strange coma. Around her hover Reverend Parris, her father and the minister of the Massachusetts town of Salem, his year-old niece Abigail Williams, and his slave Tituba. When Tituba asks if Betty will be all right, Parris yells at her to get out of the room.

How is the character tituba inportant

Summary Analysis Betty Parris has fallen into a strange coma. Around her hover Reverend Parris, her father and the minister of the How is the character tituba inportant town of Salem, his year-old niece Abigail Williams, and his slave Tituba.

When Tituba asks if Betty will be all right, Parris yells at her to get out of the room. Parris's treatment of Tituba reveals his angry and selfish character. The incident also shows Tituba's powerlessness: Active Themes Susanna Walcott arrives with news that the town doctor can't figure out what's the matter and suggests Parris look for spiritual causes.

Parris says it can't possibly be spiritual causes, though just to make sure he's asked Reverend Hale from the nearby town of Beverly to come investigate. As Susanna leaves, both Abigail and Parris caution her to keep quiet about what she's seen.

Parris and Abigail are both trying to protect their reputations: Parris by stopping Susanna from talking about what she's seen in his house, and Abigail by warning Susanna not to mention what happened in the forest. Active Themes Abigail tells Parris about rumors that witchcraft caused Betty's faint: Abigail suggests Parris publicly deny the rumors of witchcraft.

The gathered crowd suggests both a uniform social order asserting itself and the beginnings of hysteria. Active Themes Parris angrily asks if he should say he discovered his daughter and niece dancing "like heathen[s]" in the forest.

How is the character tituba inportant

Abigail admits they danced, but says that's all they did. Parris says that if the girls were conjuring spirits, he needs to know because his "enemies" will surely find out and ruin him. He says there's a group in the town that wants to drive him from his job as minister.

Witchcraft isn't just a sin, it's a threat against Parris's job and reputation. He must control the rumors to save himself.

Important Quotes From "The Crucible": Analysis & Themes

The best way to control them is to deny them, or so he thinks at this point. Abigail insists there was no witchcraft, but Parris says he saw Tituba chanting over a cauldron.

Abigail says that Tituba was just singing songs from Barbados, her homeland. Then Parris says he thinks he saw a naked body running away in the forest. Abigail swears no one was naked. Abigail holds back information, trying to make herself look as good and innocent as possible, although she's been caught doing something forbidden.

Active Themes Parris asks Abigail why Elizabeth Proctor dismissed her from her job as an assistant in the Proctor household six months earlier. He's heard rumors Elizabeth now rarely comes to church because she refuses to sit near Abigail. Parris also expresses concern that since Elizabeth dismissed Abigail, no other family has hired her.

Abigail says Elizabeth dismissed her because she refused to act like a slave, and that other women haven't hired her for the same reason.

From the SparkNotes Blog

She says her reputation in the town is spotless, and calls Elizabeth a cold woman and a gossiping liar. The charge of witchcraft, a religious sin, is here linked to other vague social transgressions. Parris and Abigail's strong concern about their reputations reveals how Salem's Puritan society required people to act according to its rigid social and religious rules.

A ruined reputation could mean a ruined life in Salem. Ann Putnam barges into the room.

The Crucible

Parris yells that no one should enter, but when he sees who it is, he invites her in. The Putnams have influence in Salem. Parris craves their support.

Putnam tells Parris this event is a mark of hell on his house. She then asks how high Betty flew. Parris denies that anyone flew, but Mrs. Putnam says witnesses saw her fly. Rumors of witchcraft become belief in witchcraft: Active Themes Thomas Putnam enters and says it's a blessing that the "thing is out now.

Parris is shocked that other girls are also sick.How Is the Character Tituba Inportant in the Crucible Essay How is the character of Tituba important in the crucible?

Explore how Miller portrays her Miller uses the character of T to lay the foundation for the whole play, when right at the start she is falsely accused of witchcraft. Tituba confesses to witchcraft, out of fear and panic, and it is very important because this is the point where Abigail sees how powerful fear and hysteria can be, Abigail copies Tituba and begins to name people as possible witches, realising how impressionable weak minded people are and how they can be swept along and controlled by hysteria.

The character of Tituba is important in the Crucible as it allows Miller to set the tone for the rest of the play right at the start, and her portrayal as an innocent victim shows us that something is deeply wrong in Salem, which ultimately leads to the hanging of innocent victims.

The character of Tituba is important in the Crucible as it allows Miller to set the tone for the rest of the play right at the start, and her portrayal as an innocent victim shows us that something is deeply wrong in Salem, which ultimately leads to the hanging of innocent victims.

Tituba (Historical) | The Salem Wiki | FANDOM powered by Wikia

What Is Tituba's Role in "The Crucible"? Tituba's role is the Reverend Parris’s slave in the play, "The Crucible." She has a small supporting role in Arthur Miller’s play, but she is the first person to be accused of witchcraft, and she was also the first to accuse others of witchcraft. Video: The Crucible: Tituba Quotes This lesson takes a look at some of the quotes from the character Tituba in Arthur Miller's 'The Crucible.' In this lesson, we will also examine how Miller uses.

Tituba in The Crucible